DEFEND supports the association of human rights struggles around the world.
1 item shopped = 1€ collected.



Human Rights Watch is a nonprofit, nongovernmental human rights organization made up of roughly 400 staff members around the globe.

Its staff consists of human rights professionals including country experts, lawyers, journalists, and academics of diverse backgrounds and nationalities.

Established in 1978, Human Rights Watch is known for its accurate fact-finding, impartial reporting, effective use of media, and targeted advocacy, often in partnership with local human rights groups.





Each year, Human Rights Watch publishes more than 100 reports and briefings on human rights conditions in some 90 countries, generating extensive coverage in local and international media.

With the leverage this brings, Human Rights Watch meets with governments, the United Nations, regional groups like the African Union and the European Union, financial institutions, and corporations to press for changes in policy and practice that promote human rights and justice around the world.

Human Rights Watch defends the rights of people worldwide. We scrupulously investigate abuses, expose the facts widely, and pressure those with power to respect rights and secure justice.

Human Rights Watch is an independent, international organization that works as part of a vibrant movement to uphold human dignity and advance the cause of human rights for all.







Health

Every country in the world is now party to at least one human rights treaty that addresses health-related rights. Yet, harmful laws, policies and practices routinely interfere with access to health care and increase vulnerability to ill health, particularly for poor, marginalized or criminalized populations.

Our work examines the right to health and a healthy environment, the right to be free from discrimination and arbitrary detention, and the right to information, free speech, expression and assembly as critical means of achieving health.

We work on infectious diseases, pollution and environmental health, sexual and reproductive health, and non-communicable disease, including access to palliative care for patients suffering with terminal illness.

Terrorism

Violent acts by non-state groups against the general population for political purposes are abhorrent crimes that, when widespread or systematic, can amount to crimes against humanity. Human Rights Watch condemns such acts. Governments have a responsibility to protect those within their jurisdiction from extremist attacks, but must ensure that all counterterrorism measures respect human rights.

Human Rights Watch monitors actions by governments and inter-governmental bodies against violent extremism to ensure they do not infringe on the rights to life, to protection from torture and ill-treatment, and to a fair trial.

We also condemn governments for targeting minorities or stifling the rights to free expression, association and peaceful assembly in the name of security. Such measures are not only unlawful under international law, they are also counter-productive.







Children's rights

Millions of children have no access to education, work long hours under hazardous conditions and are forced to serve as soldiers in armed conflict.

They suffer targeted attacks on their schools and teachers or languish in institutions or detention centers, where they endure inhumane conditions and assaults on their dignity. Young and immature, they are often easily exploited.

In many cases, they are abused by the very individuals responsible for their care. We are working to help protect children around the world, so they can grow into adults.


Migrants

Migrants – people living and working outside their country of origin – are particularly vulnerable to human rights abuses. Migrant workers in factories and on farms can endure terrible working conditions, while migrant domestic workers can face a myriad of abuses inside employers’ homes.

The trafficking of forced labor is a global problem. Human Rights Watch investigates rights violations arising when countries try to contain or divert the migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers at or within their borders, by placing adults and children in overcrowded and filthy detention centers, sometimes indefinitely.

Large numbers of migrants fleeing criminality, poverty and environmental disaster will be without the protections of refugee status. Ultimately, all migrants should be treated with dignity.





DEFEND supports the association of human rights struggles around the world.
1 item shoped = 1€ collected.



Human Rights Watch is a nonprofit, nongovernmental human rights organization made up of roughly 400 staff members around the globe.

Its staff consists of human rights professionals including country experts, lawyers, journalists, and academics of diverse backgrounds and nationalities.

Established in 1978, Human Rights Watch is known for its accurate fact-finding, impartial reporting, effective use of media, and targeted advocacy, often in partnership with local human rights groups.





Each year, Human Rights Watch publishes more than 100 reports and briefings on human rights conditions in some 90 countries, generating extensive coverage in local and international media.

With the leverage this brings, Human Rights Watch meets with governments, the United Nations, regional groups like the African Union and the European Union, financial institutions, and corporations to press for changes in policy and practice that promote human rights and justice around the world.

Human Rights Watch defends the rights of people worldwide. We scrupulously investigate abuses, expose the facts widely, and pressure those with power to respect rights and secure justice.

Human Rights Watch is an independent, international organization that works as part of a vibrant movement to uphold human dignity and advance the cause of human rights for all.







Health

Every country in the world is now party to at least one human rights treaty that addresses health-related rights. Yet, harmful laws, policies and practices routinely interfere with access to health care and increase vulnerability to ill health, particularly for poor, marginalized or criminalized populations.

Our work examines the right to health and a healthy environment, the right to be free from discrimination and arbitrary detention, and the right to information, free speech, expression and assembly as critical means of achieving health.

We work on infectious diseases, pollution and environmental health, sexual and reproductive health, and non-communicable disease, including access to palliative care for patients suffering with terminal illness.



Terrorism

Violent acts by non-state groups against the general population for political purposes are abhorrent crimes that, when widespread or systematic, can amount to crimes against humanity. Human Rights Watch condemns such acts. Governments have a responsibility to protect those within their jurisdiction from extremist attacks, but must ensure that all counterterrorism measures respect human rights.

Human Rights Watch monitors actions by governments and inter-governmental bodies against violent extremism to ensure they do not infringe on the rights to life, to protection from torture and ill-treatment, and to a fair trial.

We also condemn governments for targeting minorities or stifling the rights to free expression, association and peaceful assembly in the name of security. Such measures are not only unlawful under international law, they are also counter-productive.







Children's rights

Millions of children have no access to education, work long hours under hazardous conditions and are forced to serve as soldiers in armed conflict.

They suffer targeted attacks on their schools and teachers or languish in institutions or detention centers, where they endure inhumane conditions and assaults on their dignity. Young and immature, they are often easily exploited.

In many cases, they are abused by the very individuals responsible for their care. We are working to help protect children around the world, so they can grow into adults.





Migrants

Migrants – people living and working outside their country of origin – are particularly vulnerable to human rights abuses. Migrant workers in factories and on farms can endure terrible working conditions, while migrant domestic workers can face a myriad of abuses inside employers’ homes.

The trafficking of forced labor is a global problem. Human Rights Watch investigates rights violations arising when countries try to contain or divert the migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers at or within their borders, by placing adults and children in overcrowded and filthy detention centers, sometimes indefinitely.

Large numbers of migrants fleeing criminality, poverty and environmental disaster will be without the protections of refugee status. Ultimately, all migrants should be treated with dignity.